Joni Eareckson Tada – a godly woman- pointing out the double standards of new Disability Laws

Joni Eareckson’s Tada’s Wall Street Journal Op-Ed: The Double Standard of Disability Laws

 

We can also see how the Leftist philosophy of Obama Care is contributing to this tendency.

Abortion on demand, and assisted suicide is also part of this “culture of death” and slow errosion of morality and ethics in government.

Joni Eareckson Tada has also written, along with her pastor, Steve Estes, one of the very best books on why God allows suffering and why God allowed evil to come into existence, under His Sovereignty. It is called, “When God Weeps”. Highly recommened. Joni E. Tada has a beautiful and joyful disposition and speaks on these subjects, giving glory to God, even in the midst of incredible pain and disability.

“When God Weeps” – one of the best books on Why God allows suffering and evil under His Sovereingty

When God Weeps, by Joni Eareckson Tada and Steven Estes

Her story of how she became injured in a swimming accident and paralyzed, and continued to give glory to God even in suffering.

Joni’s story

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About Ken Temple

I am a follower of Jesus Christ. I am a sinner who has been saved by the grace of God alone (Ephesians 2:8-9), through faith alone (Galatians 2:16; Romans 3:28; 4:1-16), in Christ alone (John 14:6). But a true faith does not stay alone, it should result in change, fruit, good works, and deeper levels of repentance and hatred of my own sins of selfishness and pride. I am not better than you! I still make mistakes and sin, but the Lord is working on me, conforming me to His character. (Romans 8:28-29; 2 Corinthians 3:16-18) When I do sin, I hate the sin as it is an affront to God, and seek His forgiveness in repentance. (Mark 1:15; 2 Corinthians 7:7-10; Colossians 3:5-16 ) Praise God for His love for sinners (Romans 5:8), shown by the voluntary coming of Christ and His freely laying down His life for us (John 10:18), becoming flesh/human (John 1:1-5; 1:14; Philippians 2:5-8), dying for sins of people from all nations, tribes, and cultures (Revelation 5:9), on the cross, in history, rising from the dead (Romans 10:9-10; Matthew 28, Mark 16:1-8; Luke 24; John 20-21; 1 Corinthians chapter 15). His resurrection from the dead proved that Jesus is the Messiah, the eternal Son of God, the word of God from eternity past; and that He was all the gospels say He was and that He is truth and the life and the way to salvation. (John 14:6)
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22 Responses to Joni Eareckson Tada – a godly woman- pointing out the double standards of new Disability Laws

  1. Ken Temple says:

    Yes, have you read those 2 books by her – the two I mention above? Did you know of her when you were going to an Evangelical church, during the time that you thought you were a Christian?

  2. Ken Temple says:

    That’s great that you read her story!

    I recommend you read “When God Weeps” also; and do a study and compare the theology of God’s Sovereignty in Christianity vs. Qadar قدر /qesmat – قسمت /jabr – جبر in Islam.

  3. Ken Temple says:

    You already read “When God Weeps” ?

    I think you mean you already did an exhaustive study of قدر ،
    قسمت
    جبر

    Did you write an exhaustive article with references on the issue of comparing the two doctrines?

  4. Ken Temple says:

    “Two Doctrines” meaning
    1. The Sovereignty of God in the Bible
    vs.
    2. Qadar/Qesmat/Jabr in the Qur’an and Islam

    Not many have compared the two in an exhaustive, scholarly way.

    • JesusIsAProphet says:

      Do you see what I mean Ken? Such a book is meaningless because you can find Muslims that have all kinds of views on Qadr/Jabr that maybe exactly like how Calvinsists view it; there is no “official” view and its really of no significance on the day to day life of a believer. What do you think attracted the brother to Islam? He was attracted by monotheism and the trinity cannot compare. Think about how much Muslims love the Prophet Jesus, we think of him almost like we think of the Prophet Mohammed; I in fact am proud that I look a lot like how people speculate Jesus would’ve looked like. Yet at the end of the day, Jesus doesn’t compare to God; Jesus is of the greatest humans, God is just the Greatest. Have a nice day

  5. Ken Temple says:

    Paul tells his journey to Islam on his page at his blog.
    http://bloggingtheology.org/the-road-to-mecca-my-story/

    He started doubting the Bible and Christianity when others were over-coming sins in the 12 step program without the power of the Holy Spirit. It seems that was a crack that allowed the wrong thinking of “people are basically good” / Pelagianism / Islam (no inherited sinful nature – Surah 30:30) / no need for the power of the Holy Spirit -the crack started when he allowed that idea to enter his thoughts.

    The Evangelical church in England did not seem to equip him to handle the onslaught of liberal theology and historical criticism of Jesus and the Bible that he began reading. And that some of them were justifying homosexuality was a distress to him, and rightly so. Islam offered him a more consistent system on that issue, so he thought, since many Evangelicals in England are compromising with that moral issue, he had no one to turn to for a defense of the tradtitional view and strong stance on it to help him, it seems.

    He started reading too much liberal theology and he already had doubts about Mark 13 and Jesus’ promise to return. Apparently he never studied that issue deep enough to see that Jesus spoke the truth and He did judge Israel in 70 and ordained the Romans to come and destroy the temple, but His physical return is still future to us.

    See here – “Jesus Always Spoke the Truth”
    https://apologeticsandagape.wordpress.com/2012/04/05/jesus-always-spoke-the-truth/

    There is enough there in his story to realize that Paul’s issues are a lot deeper than only “being attracted to Monotheism”.

    But even though he claims to have been a Christian, even in his Islamic system, he logically could not have been a true Christian, since a true Christian must have the Spirit of God in them protecting them from falling away – Romans 8:9; John 3:1-8; Ezekiel 36:26-27; John 10:27-30, since in his system, there is no such thing as the Trinity or the Holy Spirit, and in Christianity one is born-again by the Holy Spirit – this shows that he was never truly converted on the inside – he just had some kind of emotional experience. Even Islam as Islam has to deny that he was a real “born-again” Christian, since in Islam there is no such thing as “the Holy Spirit”, the 3rd person of the Trinity. If it was a real conversion, he would not have turned away. (John 10:27-30) those that turn away from Christ the way he did, prove that they were never born again in the first place – Matthew 7:23 – “I never knew you” – I John 2:19 – “they left us, because they were not truly one of us.”

    • JesusIsAProphet says:

      1. Paul tells his journey to Islam on his page at his blog.
      http://bloggingtheology.org/the-road-to-mecca-my-story/

      Thanks for the link, I was actually reading his blog and trying to find if he had his “story” on there but I couldn’t find it for some reason.

      He started doubting the Bible and Christianity when others were over-coming sins in the 12 step program without the power of the Holy Spirit. It seems that was a crack that allowed the wrong thinking of “people are basically good” / Pelagianism / Islam (no inherited sinful nature – Surah 30:30) / no need for the power of the Holy Spirit -the crack started when he allowed that idea to enter his thoughts.

      Strange really, overcoming sins without the help of the Holy Spirit is indeed something that would make a Christian doubt his faith. As far as Islam saying that human beings are inherently good, then I’m sure you’re away of the hadeeth “All of Adam’s Children are constant sinners, and the best of the constant sinners are those who repent.” This point I will bring up later…

      The Evangelical church in England did not seem to equip him to handle the onslaught of liberal theology and historical criticism of Jesus and the Bible that he began reading. And that some of them were justifying homosexuality was a distress to him, and rightly so. Islam offered him a more consistent system on that issue, so he thought, since many Evangelicals in England are compromising with that moral issue, he had no one to turn to for a defense of the tradtitional view and strong stance on it to help him, it seems.

      One of the criticisms you have of Islam is that it does not focus on sins as opposed to Christianity. Yet it seems to me that the Christians that are leaving their religion to Islam are doing because, Islam seems to have more a of a focus on absolving one of sins. Do you see how that comes off as a contradiction? Of course I’m really shocked that you as a Christian would be critical of the Church of England for compromising on issues like homosexuality and how that has a negative effects on Christians, then turn around and downplay the positive effect on Muslims. Hopefully you can reconcile these issues.

      He started reading too much liberal theology and he already had doubts about Mark 13 and Jesus’ promise to return. Apparently he never studied that issue deep enough to see that Jesus spoke the truth and He did judge Israel in 70 and ordained the Romans to come and destroy the temple, but His physical return is still future to us.

      Strange that he would become a Muslim then considering Muslims also believe in Jesus’ physical return. Maybe the Islamic story of Jesus’ return made more sense to him? When we quote him we see what exactly what his problem was, perhaps you overlooked it. “I read there that Jesus taught the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple by the Romans and the end of the world would occur within the generation then living. Did Jesus get it wrong?” Is this true? I’m not a Biblical scholar so perhaps you can correct him on this.

      There is enough there in his story to realize that Paul’s issues are a lot deeper than only “being attracted to Monotheism”.

      Yes, there are a LOT of reasons to leave the Church as the staggering numbers show; but one of the main reasons is definitely the theology if not the main reason. In reality, it was also a combination of being dissatisfied with the Trinity. Notice his problem was that people were reaching this spiritual goal he wanted to attain without Jesus or the Holy Spirit; just believe in a “higher power.” Remember what I told you about believing in God and how all this theological baggage you’ve inherited just doesn’t resonate with most people.

      But even though he claims to have been a Christian, even in his Islamic system, he logically could not have been a true Christian, since a true Christian must have the Spirit of God in them protecting them from falling away – Romans 8:9; John 3:1-8; Ezekiel 36:26-27; John 10:27-30, since in his system, there is no such thing as the Trinity or the Holy Spirit, and in Christianity one is born-again by the Holy Spirit – this shows that he was never truly converted on the inside – he just had some kind of emotional experience. Even Islam as Islam has to deny that he was a real “born-again” Christian, since in Islam there is no such thing as “the Holy Spirit”, the 3rd person of the Trinity. If it was a real conversion, he would not have turned away. (John 10:27-30) those that turn away from Christ the way he did, prove that they were never born again in the first place – Matthew 7:23 – “I never knew you” – I John 2:19 – “they left us, because they were not truly one of us.”

      So according to this logic can I say that Ergun Caner was never really a Muslim? Can I say any Muslim who leaves Islam was never really a Muslim? Your argument here is very weak I hope you understand

      • Ken Temple says:

        As far as Islam saying that human beings are inherently good, then I’m sure you’re away of the hadeeth “All of Adam’s Children are constant sinners, and the best of the constant sinners are those who repent.”

        Yeah, I would appreciate that reference – can it be found here?
        http://www.searchtruth.com/hadith_books.php

        Islam is much more complicated, because in order to understand it; one needs to have all the volumes of Hadith, etc. – spend lots of money, then go to Tafsirs and Fiq and scholars to try and understand it.

        Whereas all you need is the Bible for the truth of Christianity.

      • JesusIsAProphet says:

        I wouldn’t use that site for anything other then Qur’an searches because I’ve found searching ahaadeeth in English is extremely difficult. It is however found in Musnad Ahmad, Suanan at-Tirmidhi and Suanan ibn Majah. Its one of the more famous traiditons in Islam.

        As far as Islam being hard, well I would contend its very easy. Notice how much all the Muslims agree on all the basics while the “truth” of Christianity can’t agree on whether God is a man, is three, is his own son, is his own father, this is part of the bible, its not etc If you have a question in Islam you go and ask someone knowledgeable. Sectarianism is unknown to us, we just go to any mosque and ask our scholars. Sure you have Shi’as, but even they are forced to same thing as the rest of the Muslims because our religion is clear.

  6. Ken Temple says:

    Issues of the substitutionary ransom-sacrifice as atonement for sin and God’s Sovereignty in Islam vs. the Bible here.
    “So Why did Allah Substitute an innocent ram (or lamb) in the place of Abraham’s son?”
    http://beggarsallreformation.blogspot.com/2010/01/so-why-did-allah-substitute-innocent.html

  7. Ken Temple says:

    So according to this logic can I say that Ergun Caner was never really a Muslim? Can I say any Muslim who leaves Islam was never really a Muslim? Your argument here is very weak I hope you understand

    No, because Islam has no Holy Spirit or conversion of the heart. All one has to do is to say the Shahadah sincerely and they are a Muslim, or be born into a Muslim family, they are considered Muslims.

    But I don’t think he was a really devout or practicing Muslim at all – all the evidence points away from that.

    • JesusIsAProphet says:

      No, because Islam has no Holy Spirit or conversion of the heart. All one has to do is to say the Shahadah sincerely and they are a Muslim, or be born into a Muslim family, they are considered Muslims.

      I guess my problem with that is, a) Muslims do believe the heart is the source of your spirituality and thought process and that brain has something to do with it; however, ultimately its your heart that God guides or misguides as brother Paul has quoted the hadeeth of the “flesh in the body.” This hadeeth is considered one of the 40 most importat ahadeeth in Islam as is found in the 40 Nawawi collection.

      B) That you can’t prove or disprove this. How do you know what is in my heart or Paul’s heart. I do believe that you have some of that in your heart because you’re a believer, but I as a Muslim would make the argument that you simply haven’t felt what its like to fast all day, break your fast and pray all night for 30 days straight. It is the most amazing feeling one which I cannot imagine (nor do any of the Christian converts claim) to be matched by anything in Christianity. However, I’d ultimately make the argument that using your emotion as a barrater to see what is or what isn’t truth is not a valid argument; neither religiously nor secularly. As much as reading the Qur’an and praying have amazing effects on me, ultimately what makes me happy is the belief system that brings me certainty.

      C) A Muslim who declares to be a Muslim openly but doesn’t believe in his heart is considered a Munafiq; worse then merely a kaafir. That’s why the second chapter of the Qur’an dedicates so much time to discussing them.

  8. Ken Temple says:

    When we quote him we see what exactly what his problem was, perhaps you overlooked it. “I read there that Jesus taught the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple by the Romans and the end of the world would occur within the generation then living. Did Jesus get it wrong?” Is this true? I’m not a Biblical scholar so perhaps you can correct him on this.

    No, I did not overlook that. I gave you a link for further study on that issue:
    See here – “Jesus Always Spoke the Truth”
    https://apologeticsandagape.wordpress.com/2012/04/05/jesus-always-spoke-the-truth/

  9. Ken Temple says:

    When you quote me or the opposite viewpoint, put either mine or your paragraph sentence within the code for italics.

    use the less than sign (captial of comma key)
    then type i
    then the greater than sign (captial of period key)

    at the end of your paragrapah or sentence,
    put the less than sign again
    followed by / (lower case of ?)
    then type i again
    then the greater than sign again

    🙂

    makes it easier to read.

  10. Ken Temple says:

    It is however found in Musnad Ahmad, Suanan at-Tirmidhi and Suanan ibn Majah. Its one of the more famous traiditons in Islam.

    Are those on line somewhere? What is Musnad Ahmad? That is not one in the 6 set of canonical Sunni Hadith.

    Is there a list of other collections (like Musnad Ahmad) and explanation of why they are not also in the six collections and also their dates, etc.?

    • JesusIsAProphet says:

      Hey Ken, just wanted to post this here as well so maybe your reader can benefit

      Dr. Jonathan A.C. Brown – An Introduction to Hadith

  11. Ken Temple says:

    Thanks! I hope that hour + lecture answers some of my questions. Finding the time to listen to the whole thing with understanding and finding the references will probably be a challenge, but Lord willing, I hope to set aside time to listen to it.

    You wrote a few com boxes ago:

    One of the criticisms you have of Islam is that it does not focus on sins as opposed to Christianity. Yet it seems to me that the Christians that are leaving their religion to Islam are doing because, Islam seems to have more a of a focus on absolving one of sins.

    My point is not that Christianity focuses on sin or sins more; but rather Christianity focuses more on the root of sin, the sin nature, the thoughts and motives of the heart(Mark 7:20-23; Genesis 6:5; Matthew 5:21-30), the legal guilt of sin before a holy God, and not external societal sins, like adultery, stealing, and murder. Islam does not diagnose the root of sin properly, if they dogmatically teach that people are basically good, and that what causes them to astray are their parents or environmental factors or circumstances. Islam with its punishments and Sharia law and “shame and honor” mentality in society, only deals with the external morality and behavior that is seen. But sinning in private is pervasive and some Muslims take the law into their own hands and do honor killings and terrorism, because their religion does not deal with the roots of sin.

    Do you see how that comes off as a contradiction?
    No, given what I wrote above. See the distinction?

    Of course I’m really shocked that you as a Christian would be critical of the Church of England for compromising on issues like homosexuality and how that has a negative effects on Christians, then turn around and downplay the positive effect on Muslims. Hopefully you can reconcile these issues.

    Yes, I can reconcile, given what I wrote above. When a church leaves the gospel, leaves honoring God and His Word as the standard, and becomes apostate, and that apostacy goes mainstream into the culture at large . . . well, see the results. The Episcopal Church and the Church of England as a whole, have left the doctrines of the gospel, and so have no way to teach their people properly anymore; then the internal sins grow and get manifested into the culture more and more.

    • JesusIsAProphet says:

      My point is not that Christianity focuses on sin or sins more; but rather Christianity focuses more on the root of sin, the sin nature, the thoughts and motives of the heart(Mark 7:20-23; Genesis 6:5; Matthew 5:21-30)
      That’s a pretty interesting point of view you have, but still pretty weird. I’m not sure a) how you claim something as a fact, that Christianity somehow “focuses” on the root of the sin, yet we see some of the biggest Charlatans in the world are Christians. Yet, from another point, you are assuming the 1) Christian view is right, 2) and the Muslim view is a) wrong, b) different but all you’ve provided as evidence is Christian scripture, which I don’t believe to be 100% accurate. In fact, I’d be much more persuaded if you gave me something from the Old Testemant as I do not know Matthew and Mark, they are unknown to me. As far as Genesis 6:5, didn’t I quote to you verses like that from the Qur’an which you claimed contradicted the verses that talked that human beings were born free of sin? If you look at Surah 70, especially verses 19 and onward which start with ” Verily, man (disbeliever) was created very impatient; Irritable (discontented) when evil touches him; And niggardly when good touches him. Except those who are devoted to Salat (prayers).” As you can see, I’m not sure if there is any difference between the Quranic and Torahic view except that it seems the Quranic view tells us that there is hope for those who do good deeds, while from the verse you quoted, it seems that we are just evil and there is no hope.
      However, have a problem with some of the following points:

      the legal guilt of sin before a holy God, and not external societal sins, like adultery, stealing, and murder. Islam does not diagnose the root of sin properly, if they dogmatically teach that people are basically good, and that what causes them to astray are their parents or environmental factors or circumstances.

      You are mistaking some things. First of all, you keep saying Islam says humans are basically good when we say humans do not bare the sins of other people, but they are impatient, miserly, and weak to temptation as well. Islam does not say you can blame your sins on other people, in fact, as is well known and I ‘ve quoted to you in the other post. Islam just says that people are born monotheists and it is their parents that teach them polytheism, not that human beings are born good and their parents teach them sin. Once you differentiate between those two points I think you’ll have a better understanding.

      Islam with its punishments and Sharia law and “shame and honor” mentality in society, only deals with the external morality and behavior that is seen. But sinning in private is pervasive and some Muslims take the law into their own hands and do honor killings and terrorism, because their religion does not deal with the roots of sin.

      Interesting that we got to know each other because of Ergun Caner and yet you talk about sinning in private? No disrespect but how do you know more sinning in private goes in the Muslim world? I mean if you look up the number of scandals that have happened in American churches alone (not gonna include Catholics and Orthodox) and compare it with the number of scandals that have happened in the MUSLIM WORLD for the past 1400 years and you wont find anything even remotely comparable. Every week we hear about an Ergun Caner, or a guy buying prostitutes or having gay sex. You can’t possibly compare things that happen in the dozens (honor killings) with what happens in the 100s of thousands in the non-Muslims world (murders).

      • Ken Temple says:

        Khaled,
        Thanks for that spirited discussion! I don’t think I was saying that “more sinning takes place in private in the Muslim world THAN in the Western or Christian world.” If it came across that way, I apologize, and that was not my point. My point was the overall emphasis in teaching in churches on how to deal with sin vs. the seeming overall emphasis in the Muslim world – there is no separation between religion and government in consistent Islam. So the culture reflects more from the religion and the nature of sinners – than western culture. Western culture is more of a mixture of both secularism and historical Christianity and western capitalism. Let me be clear – we are not better than you – I am not better than you – we are all sinners and guilty before a holy God and need His grace in Al Masih’s atonement and the Holy Spirit.

        The “shame and honor” aspect of Islamic culture is more pervasive than in western culture, don’t you agree?

        Western culture exposes sins more readily because of the whole history of our culture and that Christianity has informed that – that honesty and open confession is more important than hiding one’s wrong doing. But, according to that Hadith that Hamza Yusuf quoted, it seems, at least to some degree, that that shows how the hiding and “shame and honor” principle is embedded in the religion of Islam. Lying is more acceptable in Islam – there is even a Hadith that gives 3 or 4 exceptions that make lying ok.

  12. Ken Temple says:

    You know more about the scandals in the west because 2,000 years of that teaching of emphasis on that open confession has informed our culture, along with freedom of the press, etc. and lack of punishments in the west vs. the punishments and fear of punishments as in Islam; whereas Islam generally, does not publicize its embarressing stuff (shame and honor principle again)- and that Hadith that Hamza Yusuf quoted seems to give consistency to that idea.

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