The Empty Tomb – Jesus rose from the dead ! But centuries of tradition and gaudy decorations cover up the impact of the historical event

Archeological evidence for Jesus death and resurrection

Apologetics and Agape

Empty Tomb

The Scriptures testify to the empty tomb of Jesus the Messiah and His bodily resurrection from the dead.  Please keep reading to the end to see the Biblical evidence for the Resurrection of Christ. Jesus was probably buried in a tomb that looked something similar to this one, pictured above, or like the one pictured below.

The real tomb where Jesus was probably buried is now inside the “Church of the Holy Sepulchre”, inside another edicule, covered over by centuries of building and repair, and layers of history of damage and repair, tradition and decoration.  The original rock hillside was excavated in order to build a church there.  (In 326 AD, by Constantine, inspired by his mother Helena’s visit there.)  Before Constantine had a church built there, the Romans (Hadrian in 135 AD) had built pagan temples (to Jupiter and Venus) on the site, in order to keep Christians from…

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About Ken Temple

I am a follower of Jesus Christ. I am a sinner who has been saved by the grace of God alone (Ephesians 2:8-9), through faith alone (Galatians 2:16; Romans 3:28; 4:1-16), in Christ alone (John 14:6). But a true faith does not stay alone, it should result in change, fruit, good works, and deeper levels of repentance and hatred of my own sins of selfishness and pride. I am not better than you! I still make mistakes and sin, but the Lord is working on me, conforming me to His character. (Romans 8:28-29; 2 Corinthians 3:16-18) When I do sin, I hate the sin as it is an affront to God, and seek His forgiveness in repentance. (Mark 1:15; 2 Corinthians 7:7-10; Colossians 3:5-16 ) Praise God for His love for sinners (Romans 5:8), shown by the voluntary coming of Christ and His freely laying down His life for us (John 10:18), becoming flesh/human (John 1:1-5; 1:14; Philippians 2:5-8), dying for sins of people from all nations, tribes, and cultures (Revelation 5:9), on the cross, in history, rising from the dead (Romans 10:9-10; Matthew 28, Mark 16:1-8; Luke 24; John 20-21; 1 Corinthians chapter 15). His resurrection from the dead proved that Jesus is the Messiah, the eternal Son of God, the word of God from eternity past; and that He was all the gospels say He was and that He is truth and the life and the way to salvation. (John 14:6)
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10 Responses to The Empty Tomb – Jesus rose from the dead ! But centuries of tradition and gaudy decorations cover up the impact of the historical event

  1. θ says:

    Unfortunately, Jesus never appears again to counter Jews who spread a lie that his dead body was stolen by his disciples, or to convince Jews who expect him to fulfill his words of getting resurrected.
    Mt 28
    12 And when they were assembled with the elders, and had taken counsel, they gave large money unto the soldiers,13 Saying, Say ye, His disciples came by night, and stole him away while we slept.14 And if this come to the governor’s ears, we will persuade him, and secure you.15 So they took the money, and did as they were taught: and this saying is commonly reported among the Jews until this day.

    Concerning the end-story of his encounter with Disciples, four Gospels differ each other:
    1. Matthew: Jesus’s story ends with the indication he stays forever on the earth with Disciples – a typical cliffhanger style – after he came to them at the mountain of Galilee, as Mt 28:16.
    2. Mark: Jesus’ story ends with the ascension to heaven, at the time when the eleven Disciples ate altogether on the table (usually that refers to the evening dinner) in a house, at somewhere, as Mk 16:14.
    3. Luke: Jesus’ story ends with the ascension to heaven from Bethany of Jerusalem, probably at the noon or midday, as Lk 24:50.
    4. John: Jesus’ story just ends with the indication he stays forever with Disciples on the earth – a cliffhanger style – somewhere at the panoramic Galilean seashore, as Jn 21:11.

  2. Ken Temple says:

    That is ridiculous – because Jesus did rise from the dead and appeared to many, both believers (disciples) and unbelievers (Saul of Tarsus and James, His half-brother – 1 Cor. 15:1-9; Gal. 1:19)

    Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John all have the empty tomb; and Matthew, Luke, and John have the appearances of Jesus in His resurrection body to disciples, etc. Mark has the empty tomb – Mark 16:1-8, but there is some doubt as to verses 9-20, which we admit is not in the earliest extant manuscripts. But Irenaeus does quote Mark 16:19 around 180-200 AD. (earliest piece from that section).

    Acts chapter 1 is the continuation of Luke and gives more details on more appearances and the ascension into heaven.

    Each of the gospels give different details from different perspectives, but they harmonize around the same historical events. 4 directions give 4 different views and details of one historical event.

    Just because they give different details does not mean they are contradictions. They each chose to emphasize different appearance historical events. You need to read and study a Harmony of the Gospels. There are many. I recommend this one.

    http://www.amazon.com/Harmony-Gospels-American-Standard-Edition/dp/006063524X

  3. θ says:

    Which James? Of course only James the Disciple sees Jesus’ apparition. There are many Jameses in the New Testament, one of them is a Disciple (Luke 9:28, Luke 9:54) and James the brother of Jesus whom Paul sees (Gal. 1:19).
    Paul doesn’t see Jesus, he just hears the voice in Hebrew. Rather, Paul’s eyes got blinded. Afterward, his eye’s sickness (caused by Satan’s messenger) can’t be cured.

  4. Ken Temple says:

    James the half-brother of Jesus – as the Scripture says in Galatians 1:19 and I Corinthians 15:1-9. (verse 7)

    The disciple James, the brother of John, was killed in Acts 12:1-2 by Herod Agrippa I.

    Both James and Paul saw Jesus in His resurrection body, but with Saul of Tarsus (Paul), the Lord also shown as a bright light and blinded him.

    I Corinthians 9:1; I Cor. 15:8 with Acts chapters 9, 22, 26

  5. Ken Temple says:

    θ – I appreciate you visiting here and commenting so much. You seem to have a lot of time on your hands. I don’t have time to answer all of your points or comments, but I am trying to sincerely answer the ones that I have time for and can answer quickly.

    when I don’t seem to answer some of your stuff, it is because I don’t have time, or I don’t understand your point. A lot of your points are not understandable very easily.

  6. θ says:

    Indeed Paul does see other James (Gal. 1:19), but James the brother of Jesus never sees the risen Jesus. All Jameses are alive before Jesus ascends.
    Gal 1:19 But other of the apostles saw I (that is, Paul as speaker there) none, save James the Lord’s brother.

    Both Disciples named James, James the John’s brother (son of Zebedee) and James the Less (son of Alphaeus), are alive, safe and sound before and after Jesus’ ascension.
    1Cor 15:7 After that, he was seen of James; then of all the apostles.

  7. Ken Temple says:

    The James of Galatians 1:19 and 1 Cor. 15:7-8 is the same James who is half-brother of Jesus and author of the epistle of James. And he is called an apostle, as your quotes even admit.

  8. θ says:

    “Ken Temple says: And he is called an apostle, as your quotes even admit.”

    If Paul referred him to particular James, he would have called him “James the Lord’s brother”.
    James the John’s brother (son of Zebedee) and James the Less (son of Alphaeus), are called apostle too.

  9. Ken Temple says:

    If Paul referred him to particular James, he would have called him “James the Lord’s brother”.

    You are tenacious . . .

    He did in Galatians 1:19 and it is understood in 1 Cor. 15:7, because there are two other James within “the 12” (verse 5, and expression that does not include Judas Ischariot obviously), he cannot have meant just one of them in “the 12” or “the rest of the apostles”.

    Tradition, scholars, church history, all agree that Gal. 1:19 and 1 Cor. 15:7 is James, the half-brother of Jesus, and author of the epistle of James.

    The apostle Paul is clearly also calling James the half-brother of Jesus, “an apostle” which is why he had authority to write the book of James and it is included in the canon.

  10. θ says:

    “Ken Temple says: Tradition, scholars, church history, all agree that Gal. 1:19 and 1 Cor. 15:7 is James, the half-brother of Jesus, and author of the epistle of James.”

    Logically, Paul is proven to have spread a lie in his writing because James doesn’t come to the tomb, so how can he precede Peter and others on seeing Jesus’ apparition? Lest Gospels are fairy tale, under what circumstances did Jesus appear firstly to James before he met with Peter or the eleven?

    1Cor 15:7 After that, he was seen of James; then of all the apostles.
    vs.
    Jn 20:19 Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you.
    Lk 24
    13 And, behold, two of them went that same day to a village called Emmaus, which was from Jerusalem about threescore furlongs.18 And the one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answering said unto him, Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem, and hast not known the things which are come to pass there in these days?

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