Sola Scriptura – Part 4 – Dr. James White

 

 

About Ken Temple

I am a follower of Jesus Christ. I am a sinner who has been saved by the grace of God alone (Ephesians 2:8-9), through faith alone (Galatians 2:16; Romans 3:28; 4:1-16), in Christ alone (John 14:6). But a true faith does not stay alone, it should result in change, fruit, good works, and deeper levels of repentance and hatred of my own sins of selfishness and pride. I am not better than you! I still make mistakes and sin, but the Lord is working on me, conforming me to His character. (Romans 8:28-29; 2 Corinthians 3:16-18) When I do sin, I hate the sin as it is an affront to God, and seek His forgiveness in repentance. (Mark 1:15; 2 Corinthians 7:7-10; Colossians 3:5-16 ) Praise God for His love for sinners (Romans 5:8), shown by the voluntary coming of Christ and His freely laying down His life for us (John 10:18), becoming flesh/human (John 1:1-5; 1:14; Philippians 2:5-8), dying for sins of people from all nations, tribes, and cultures (Revelation 5:9), on the cross, in history, rising from the dead (Romans 10:9-10; Matthew 28, Mark 16:1-8; Luke 24; John 20-21; 1 Corinthians chapter 15). His resurrection from the dead proved that Jesus is the Messiah, the eternal Son of God, the word of God from eternity past; and that He was all the gospels say He was and that He is truth and the life and the way to salvation. (John 14:6)
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6 Responses to Sola Scriptura – Part 4 – Dr. James White

  1. θ says:

    The rise of the Roman Catholicism that was based on the works, Tradition, and Magisterium rather than Sola Scriptura and Sola Fide also proves the failure and defeat of the Pauline Christianity.

    • Ken Temple says:

      except it did not happen until centuries later. Early Catholicism is not the same as “Roman Catholicism”, yet even they claim they agree with the apostle Paul. “Roman Catholicism” is not in the early centuries. One could argue that it does not come about until Gregory “the Great” (600 AD) and afterward, since then is when Purgatory, Indulgences, treasury of merit, Transubstantiation (800s – 1215 AD and beyond), the merit of works, Marian piety and dogmas, Papal claims really take off and develop over centuries, culminating in the Council of Trent (1545-1563), IC of Mary (1854), Papal Infallibility (1870) and BA of Mary (1950).

      • θ says:

        “Ken Temple says: except it did not happen until centuries later. ”

        By using the term “Catholic Church” for his treatise, Cyprian of Carthage establishes the merit of works for the early Catholics against the proto-Sola Fide in 251 AD, almost one century before the Nicene Council.
        Cyprian of Carthage, The Unity of the Catholic Church 251 AD
        The Lord denounces, and says, ‘Many shall say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in your name, and in your name have cast out devils, and in your name done many wonderful works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, you who work iniquity’ [Matt. 7:21–23]. There is need of righteousness, that one may deserve well of God the Judge; we must obey his precepts and warnings, that our merits may receive their reward.

        Also, shortly after the Nicene Council, Council of Orange in 529 AD produces a statement on the works against the proto-Sola Fide.
        Council of Orange II
        “Grace is preceded by no merits. A reward is due to good works, if they are performed, but grace, which is not due, precedes [good works], that they may be done”

        Some citations of early Catholics before Nicene Council against the proto-Sola Fide:
        -Ignatius of Antioch, Letter to Polycarp, 110 AD
        Let your works be as your deposited withholdings, so that you may receive the back-pay which has accrued to you.
        -Justin Martyr, First Apology, 151 AD
        We have learned from the prophets and we hold it as true that punishments and chastisements and good rewards are distributed according to the merit of each man’s actions.
        -Tatian, Address to the Greeks, 170 AD.
        The wicked man is justly punished, having become depraved of himself; and the just man is worthy of praise for his honest deeds, since it was in his free choice that he did not transgress the will of God
        -Athenagoras, The Resurrection of the Dead, 178 AD
        The examination relates to individuals, and the reward or punishment of lives ill or well spent is proportioned to the merit of each.
        -Theophilus, To Autolycus, 181 AD
        He who gave the mouth for speech and formed the ears for hearing and made eyes for seeing will examine everything and will judge justly, granting recompense to each according to merit. To those who seek immortality by the patient exercise of good works [Rom. 2:7], he will give everlasting life, joy, peace, rest, and all good things, which neither eye has seen nor ear has heard, nor has it entered into the heart of man [1 Cor. 2:9]. For the unbelievers and the contemptuous and for those who do not submit to the truth but assent to iniquity…there will be wrath and indignation [Rom. 2:8]
        -Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 189 AD
        We may receive a crown and so that we may regard as a precious crown that which we acquire by our own struggle and which does not grow upon us spontaneously.
        -Tertullian, To the Nations, 195 AD
        Again, we affirm that a judgment has been ordained by God according to the merits of every man.
        -Hippolytus, Against the Greeks, 212 AD
        The justice of that cry will be apparent in the recompense made to each. To those who have done well, everlasting enjoyment shall be given; while to lovers of evil shall be given eternal punishment.
        -Cyprian of Carthage, The Unity of the Catholic Church 251 AD
        The Lord denounces, and says, ‘Many shall say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in your name, and in your name have cast out devils, and in your name done many wonderful works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, you who work iniquity’ [Matt. 7:21–23]. There is need of righteousness, that one may deserve well of God the Judge; we must obey his precepts and warnings, that our merits may receive their reward.
        -Cyprian of Carthage, Works and Almsgivings, 253 AD
        You who are a matron rich and wealthy, anoint not your eyes with the antimony of the devil, but with the collyrium of Christ, so that you may at last come to see God, when you have merited before God both by your works and by your manner of living.
        -Lactantius, Epitome of the Divine Institutes, 317 AD
        May hold fast innocence, may be of service to as many as possible, may gain for himself incorruptible treasures by good works, that he may be able, with God for his judge, to gain for the merits of his virtue either the crown of faith, or the reward of immortality.

        After Nicene Council against the proto-Sola Fide:
        -Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 350 AD
        The root of every good work is the hope of the resurrection, for the expectation of a reward nerves the soul to good work.
        -Jerome, Against Jovinian 393 AD
        Why should virgins persevere? Why should widows toil? Why should married women be content? Let us all sin, and after we repent we shall be the same as the apostles are?
        -Augustine, Various Questions to Simplician, 396 AD
        We are commanded to live righteously, and the reward is set before us of our meriting to live happily in eternity.
        -Augustine, Letters, 412 AD
        When our every good merit is produced in us only by grace and when God, crowning our merits, crowns nothing else but his own gifts to us.

        Moreover, shortly after Nicene Council, the Catholics also produce the list of canons different than what later Protestants have.
        The Council of Carthage, canon, (on 28 August 397).
        It was also determined that besides the Canonical Scriptures nothing be read in the Church under the title of divine Scriptures. The Canonical Scriptures are these: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua the son of Nun, Judges, Ruth, four books of Kings, two books of Paraleipomena, Job, the Psalter, five books of Solomon, the books of the twelve prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezechiel, Daniel, Tobit, Judith, Esther, two books of Esdras, two books of the Maccabees. Of the New Testament: four books of the Gospels, one book of the Acts of the Apostles, thirteen Epistles of the Apostle Paul, one epistle of the same [writer] to the Hebrews, two Epistles of the Apostle Peter, three of John, one of James, one of Jude, one book of the Apocalypse of John. Let this be made known also to our brother and fellow-priest Boniface, or to other bishops of those parts, for the purpose of confirming that Canon. Because we have received from our fathers that those books must be read in the Church. Let it also be allowed that the Passions of Martyrs be read when their festivals are kept.

  2. Ken Temple says:

    Cyprian, Ignatius, Irenaeus, etc. were “catholic”, but not “Roman Catholic”.

    • θ says:

      Both “catholic” and “Roman Catholic” were based on the works, Tradition, and Magisterium rather than Sola Scriptura and Sola Fide also proves the failure and defeat of the Pauline Christianity.

      • θ says:

        Both “catholic” and “Roman Catholic” were based on the works, Tradition, and Magisterium rather than Sola Scriptura and Sola Fide. This proves the failure and defeat of the Pauline Christianity. Pauline Christianity was not a dominant religion until the time of Reformation.

        (i) Jews decimated Christian Gentiles during Bar Kochba Revolt (132-136 AD).
        Justin, Apology, 13
        For in the Jewish war which lately raged, Barchochebas, the leader of the revolt of the Jews, gave orders that Christians alone should be led to cruel punishments, unless they would deny Jesus Christ and utter blasphemy.

        (ii) The Romans decimated Christian Gentiles.
        Suetonius, Nero, 16
        Punishment was inflicted on the Christians, a class of men given to a new and mischievous superstition.
        //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damnatio_ad_bestias
        The Passion of St. Perpetua, St. Felicitas, and their Companions”, a text which purports to be an eyewitness account of a group of Christians condemned to damnatio ad bestias at Carthage in 203, states that the men were required to dress in the robes of a priest of the Roman god Saturn, the women as priestesses of Ceres and were shown to the crowd as such. The men and women were brought back out in separate groups and first the men, then the women, exposed to a variety of wild beasts.
        Under Diocletian and Galerius
        //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Christians_martyred_during_the_reign_of_Diocletian
        Modern historians estimate that during this period, known as the Diocletianic or Great Persecution and extending several years beyond the reign of Diocletian, as many as 3,000−3,500 Christians were executed under the authority of Imperial edicts.[1]

        A group whom Qur’an specifically promises of safety, survival and domination is the Ebionites (Christ-believing Jews), whereas the early Christian Gentiles got persecuted by both Jews and the Romans. Pauline Christianity was not a dominant religion until the time of Reformation.
        Q.61, v.14. O ye who believe, be ye helpers of God, as said Jesus the son of Mary to the disciples: Who will be my helpers to God? The disciples said, We are God’s helpers. And a faction of the children of Israel believed and a faction disbelieved. So We supported those who believed against their enemy, and they became dominant.
        Parallel:
        Lk 10:19
        Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.
        Mk 12:36
        For David himself said by the Holy Ghost, The Lord said to my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool.

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